A happy future? we read about it hear talk of it and we see the present lived by other modern civilizations and it’s not yet within our reach Ultimately this sense of feeling has been identified as the cardinal characteristic of contemporary Arab culture particularly that of us the Arab youth namely restlessness and disturbance I’ve been aware all my life that I come from different cultures the Palestinian the Arameic and the Swedish However my parents are the result of the silent genocide that ripped them of their language definition of ethnicity and the enforcement to be a part of the pan vision of Arab and Turkish mentality I’m not brown enough to be Middleastern I’m not blond enough to be Swedish I’ve tried to please them all Contemporary Arab cultures are still imprisoned by assumption; the stereotypical image of an Arab still persists this identity card entitles the bearer to live work vote and freely enter and leave the Occupied Territory coffee with an old acquaintance Jaffa orange for Palestinians it symbolises the lost of their homeland and its destruction For people living in diaspora food is the link with the past that lasts forever Writing my name in a language I can only speak not read or write here’s the exquisite paradox every time You have accepted and surrendered You have first struggled In other words You couldn’t have surrendered before the struggle There would be no meaning in it So surrender and struggle are really two sides of the same coin The Tower of Babel legend is one of the oldest and most familiar stories of humanity It is believed to have been the reason for the many languages throughout the world but careful inspection proves it to be much more than we ever imagined If I was born in some other country I would be waving some other flag The immigrant visa process bureau of consular affairs us department of state No Arab loves the desert We love water and green trees There is nothing in the desert and no man needs nothing Most people are principally aware of one culture one setting one home | exiles are aware of at least two and this plurality of vision gives rise to an awareness of simultaneous dimensions I myself seem to be deconstructed by fate What is has always been yet has to await its realizations to give it presence Presence against existence A Bird is Not a Stone exile for man is not specific in time or space but a cyclical process that is experienced by every single person even those who would declare that they have no intentions of returning back In a certain way although imposed and unwelcome orange is still a Palestinian color The orange orchards and fruits are indeed well represented in the ‘nostalgia literature’ of the Palestinian refugees where they symbolise the tragic Palestinian destiny and the natural connection of an uprooted people to its land In the novella the men die in silence Use of flags outside of military or naval context begins only with the rise of nationalist sentiment Palestinian girls overlooking the construction of the Wall Alam if my homeland Let me tell you a little about heartache Its very bad said a receptionist reached by telephone in the Holiday Inn Theyre shooting all around the hotel Still untouched by Beirut’s development rush the Holiday Inn stands as a symbol of war in a circle of progression The hotel built around 1974 was a large hub of tourism with 26 stories a restaurant nightclub and 400 rooms Its magnitude for the time made it a symbol of luxury and a reflection of Beirut’s golden ageThe Battle of the Hotels also known as the Hotel front was a subconflict within the 1975–77 phase of the Lebanese Civil War which occurred in the Minet-el-Hosn hotel district of downtown Beirut This area was one of the first fronts of the war that began in April 1975 The battle was fought for the possession of a small hotel complex the St Charles City Center adjacent to the gilded Corniche seafront area on the Mediterranean in the north-western corner of the downtown district of Beirut a tourist activity destined for the rich Its a shadow I can’t stop chasinWhereas the tourist generally hurried back home at the end of a few weeks or months the traveler belonging no more to one place than to the next moves slowly over periods of years from one part of the earth to another Indeed he would have found it difficult to tell among the many places he had lived precisely where he had felt most at home Arabic Coffee Arabic coffee Arabic قهوة عربية‎ is a general name that refers to the two main ways coffee is prepared in many Arab countries Turkish-style and Saudi Coffee The Turkish coffee brewing method is common in the Levant but brewed without the addition of sugar Cardamom is often added or it is served plain قهوة سادة qahwah sādah lit plain coffee Saudi coffee or ‘’Al-Qahwa’’ Arabic قهوة‎ qahwah is made from green unroasted coffee beans and cardamom and is a traditional beverage in Arabian culture It is often served with dates or candied fruit This brewing method is common in Najd and Hijaz and sometimes other spices like saffron to give it a golden color cloves and cinnamon Some people add a little evaporated milk to slightly alter its color; however this is rare It is served from a special coffee pot called dalla Arabic دلة‎ and the coffee cups are small with no handle The portions are small covering just the bottom of the cup It is served in homes and in good restaurants by specially clad waiters called gahwaji and it is almost always accompanied with dates It is always offered with the compliments of the house It is also offered at most social events like weddings and funerals Arabic Coffee - The Recipe Traditional Bedouin Style Coffee Recipe One small pot of water There is no set amount of water but about 1/2 liter or around a pint is good 1 1/2 baby milk scoops of coffee blend Scant 1/4 tsp Cloves Saffron if desired teeny pinch of ginger powder if desired 1/2 baby milk scoop of any kind of coffee creamer powder Just boil the water add the coffee blend and let simmer for a little while 10 - 15 mins Add the cloves and saffronginger Let sit for a few minutes 5 at most on a low fire and then put into a della or thermos and add the coffee creamer Serve in small cups called finaajeen how holy should we deem the symbols we ourselves manufacture and whether we should choose individually if we want to regard a song a flag a symbol of State and power as sacred Contemporary Arab cultures are still imprisoned by assumption the stereotypical image of an Arab still persists countries that are built on settler colonialism and the ethnic cleansing of its indigenous populations gotta stick together apparently For many Israelis the slightly acrid scent of botz evokes memories of army service It also helps bridge the countrys ethnic divide it being as popular with Bedouin Arabs and Druze as it is with Jews All of my flags all the elements of these works are of such n degree of reality That the result cannot be a mere hypothetis the result is real My Flags is not a burden They are objects through their own agency with my flags I free myself A happy future? we read about it hear talk of it and we see the present lived by other modern civilizations and it’s not yet within our reach Ultimately this sense of feeling has been identified as the cardinal characteristic of contemporary Arab culture particularly that of us the Arab youth namely restlessness and disturbance I’ve been aware all my life that I come from different cultures the Palestinian the Arameic and the Swedish However my parents are the result of the silent genocide that ripped them of their language definition of ethnicity and the enforcement to be a part of the pan vision of Arab and Turkish mentality I’m not brown enough to be Middleastern I’m not blond enough to be Swedish I’ve tried to please them all Contemporary Arab cultures are still imprisoned by assumption; the stereotypical image of an Arab still persists this identity card entitles the bearer to live work vote and freely enter and leave the Occupied Territory coffee with an old acquaintance Jaffa orange for Palestinians it symbolises the lost of their homeland and its destruction For people living in diaspora food is the link with the past that lasts forever Writing my name in a language I can only speak not read or write here’s the exquisite paradox every time You have accepted and surrendered You have first struggled In other words You couldn’t have surrendered before the struggle There would be no meaning in it So surrender and struggle are really two sides of the same coin The Tower of Babel legend is one of the oldest and most familiar stories of humanity It is believed to have been the reason for the many languages throughout the world but careful inspection proves it to be much more than we ever imagined If I was born in some other country I would be waving some other flag The immigrant visa process bureau of consular affairs us department of state No Arab loves the desert We love water and green trees There is nothing in the desert and no man needs nothing Most people are principally aware of one culture one setting one home | exiles are aware of at least two and this plurality of vision gives rise to an awareness of simultaneous dimensions I myself seem to be deconstructed by fate What is has always been yet has to await its realizations to give it presence Presence against existence A Bird is Not a Stone exile for man is not specific in time or space but a cyclical process that is experienced by every single person even those who would declare that they have no intentions of returning back In a certain way although imposed and unwelcome orange is still a Palestinian color The orange orchards and fruits are indeed well represented in the ‘nostalgia literature’ of the Palestinian refugees where they symbolise the tragic Palestinian destiny and the natural connection of an uprooted people to its land In the novella the men die in silence Use of flags outside of military or naval context begins only with the rise of nationalist sentiment Palestinian girls overlooking the construction of the Wall Alam if my homeland Let me tell you a little about heartache Its very bad said a receptionist reached by telephone in the Holiday Inn Theyre shooting all around the hotel Still untouched by Beirut’s development rush the Holiday Inn stands as a symbol of war in a circle of progression The hotel built around 1974 was a large hub of tourism with 26 stories a restaurant nightclub and 400 rooms Its magnitude for the time made it a symbol of luxury and a reflection of Beirut’s golden ageThe Battle of the Hotels also known as the Hotel front was a subconflict within the 1975–77 phase of the Lebanese Civil War which occurred in the Minet-el-Hosn hotel district of downtown Beirut This area was one of the first fronts of the war that began in April 1975 The battle was fought for the possession of a small hotel complex the St Charles City Center adjacent to the gilded Corniche seafront area on the Mediterranean in the north-western corner of the downtown district of Beirut a tourist activity destined for the rich Its a shadow I can’t stop chasinWhereas the tourist generally hurried back home at the end of a few weeks or months the traveler belonging no more to one place than to the next moves slowly over periods of years from one part of the earth to another Indeed he would have found it difficult to tell among the many places he had lived precisely where he had felt most at home Arabic Coffee Arabic coffee Arabic قهوة عربية‎ is a general name that refers to the two main ways coffee is prepared in many Arab countries Turkish-style and Saudi Coffee The Turkish coffee brewing method is common in the Levant but brewed without the addition of sugar Cardamom is often added or it is served plain قهوة سادة qahwah sādah lit plain coffee Saudi coffee or ‘’Al-Qahwa’’ Arabic قهوة‎ qahwah is made from green unroasted coffee beans and cardamom and is a traditional beverage in Arabian culture It is often served with dates or candied fruit This brewing method is common in Najd and Hijaz and sometimes other spices like saffron to give it a golden color cloves and cinnamon Some people add a little evaporated milk to slightly alter its color; however this is rare It is served from a special coffee pot called dalla Arabic دلة‎ and the coffee cups are small with no handle The portions are small covering just the bottom of the cup It is served in homes and in good restaurants by specially clad waiters called gahwaji and it is almost always accompanied with dates It is always offered with the compliments of the house It is also offered at most social events like weddings and funerals Arabic Coffee - The Recipe Traditional Bedouin Style Coffee Recipe One small pot of water There is no set amount of water but about 1/2 liter or around a pint is good 1 1/2 baby milk scoops of coffee blend Scant 1/4 tsp Cloves Saffron if desired teeny pinch of ginger powder if desired 1/2 baby milk scoop of any kind of coffee creamer powder Just boil the water add the coffee blend and let simmer for a little while 10 - 15 mins Add the cloves and saffronginger Let sit for a few minutes 5 at most on a low fire and then put into a della or thermos and add the coffee creamer Serve in small cups called finaajeen how holy should we deem the symbols we ourselves manufacture and whether we should choose individually if we want to regard a song a flag a symbol of State and power as sacred Contemporary Arab cultures are still imprisoned by assumption the stereotypical image of an Arab still persists countries that are built on settler colonialism and the ethnic cleansing of its indigenous populations gotta stick together apparently For many Israelis the slightly acrid scent of botz evokes memories of army service It also helps bridge the countrys ethnic divide it being as popular with Bedouin Arabs and Druze as it is with Jews All of my flags all the elements of these works are of such n degree of reality That the result cannot be a mere hypothetis the result is real My Flags is not a burden They are objects through their own agency with my flags I free myself